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3/18/2013 - It's National Flood Safety Awareness Week


FEMA, the NWS and other organizations created National Flood Safety Awareness Week to inform people of dangers of flooding.

From snowstorms to thunderstorms, hurricanes to tornadoes, virtually every natural weather event has its own unique set of characteristics. But one thing they all share in common is their potential to bring significant amounts of rainfall - something that all homeowners should be prepared for.

That's why several organizations, such as the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) and the National Weather Service formed an annual campaign known as National Flood Safety Awareness Week. This year, during the week of March 18 - 22, safety officials throughout the country will set out to inform residents about the various pitfalls that can result from large amounts of water brought on by melting snow, heavy rain or poor drainage. Whether providing safety tips, or simply sharing the truths about what to expect, the campaign offers many insights on what consumers should do to avoid the consequences following a flood.

Often, one of the key messages is educating consumers of the benefits of flood insurance. Since 1968, homeowners and renters have been able to get coverage for flooding through the National Flood Insurance Program, which insures millions of people throughout the country, sparing them from significant losses after a storm. And, as with all insurance policies, it's important to have the plan in place prior to a major weather event, as there is a 30-day waiting period for the protection to kick in after it's been purchased. In other words, if a major storm occurs and a home is flooded within that 30-day window, homeowners will have to pay for the damage out of pocket. This makes obtaining coverage as soon as possible crucial.

Please speak with an independent Selective agent for more information about Flood Safety Awareness Week and how to mitigate the effects of flooding.


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